[Reading The Dead Lake] Ebook by Hamid Ismailov

characters The Dead Lake

Not growing up into a man We also wander in a beautiful fierce landscape unlike any other we find in Western Literature And by the end of Yerzhan's tale we are awe struck by our human resilience in the face of catastrophic man made follies' Meike Ziervogel Peirene Press. This is an astonishing novella which at 122 pages is full of lyricism and poetry traditional tales music and the modern day horror of nuclear testing An intro tells the reader that from 1949 to 1989 468 nuclear explosions were tested in a test site in the Kazakh steppes This story tells of Yerzhan a 27 year old man who looks like a 12 year old boy whom the narrator meets on a train selling yoghurt and playing his violin He then tells the story of his and his families exposure to nuclear radiation Part folk tale with magical elements it has a love story within it and a picture of the traditions of the Steppes An excellent read giving a snapshot of a region the size of Europe devastated by nuclear testing Yerzhan is a interesting hero who like Oscar in The Tin Drum is a man in the body of a child who in a chilling scene has bathed in the Dead Lake of the title his love interest Aisulu who lives with the family next to his in two isolated huts on the side of the remote railway is also affected I would recommend this book and given its length I am tempted to read it again before it goes back to the library

characters ✓ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Hamid Ismailov

The Dead Lake

A haunting Russian tale about the environmental legacy of the Cold War Yerzhan grows up in a remote part of Kazakhstan where the Soviets tests atomic weapons As a young boy he falls in love with the neighbour's daughter and one evening to impress her he dives into a for. A story told during a train journey thorough the vast steppes of Kazakhstan by a violinist who relates his life in a small village near a nuclear test site simply referred to as The Zone that had dramatic conseuences in his life Hamid Ismailov mentions that for forty years during the cold war in that populated region the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site conducted nuclear explosions both atmospheric and underground As a result the twenty seven year old Yerzhan s growth was affected and he looked like a little boy The novella is centered in the destiny of two families with a similar past tied together by circumstances that we learn as the story unfolds Yerzhan a normal looking boy shows incredible musical talent at an early age His grandfather teaches him to play the lute like dombra and his uncle gives him a violin and encourages him to take lessons They both travel to a neighboring town where Petko a Bulgarian violinist who had studied at the Moscow Conservatory with the legendary David Oistrakh becomes his teacher When uncle Shaken proclaims that his talented nephew will go to the conservatory Yerzhan is terrified Did they want to conserve him Like fruit in a jam and cucumbers in brine At seven he entered school which meant he had to walk every day eight kilometers from his town and back During a trip with his class they visited The Zone and stopped at The Dead Lake Because of its calm waters the children thought it looked like a fairy tale lake but they were strictly forbidden to drink the water or even touch it Yerzhan took his clothes off and entered the lake to the astonished eyes of his classmates The narrator goes back and forth between Yerzhan s story and the train ride describing the long grassland when his companion is asleep The trembling earth as an ominous presence leads always to The Zone and the central place it holds in the village its people and Yerzhan s fate

Hamid Ismailov ↠ 8 Read

Bidden lake The radio active water changes Yerzhan He will never grow into a man While the girl he loves becomes a beautiful woman'Like a Grimm's Fairy tale this story transforms an innermost fear into an outward reality We witness a prepubescent boy's secret terror of. Ominous and timely when you think about our own man who never grew up s plans to destroy our water


10 thoughts on “The Dead Lake

  1. says:

    A story told during a train journey thorough the vast steppes of Kazakhstan by a violinist who relates his life in a small

  2. says:

    Whilst on a train journey across Kazakhstan the narrator meets Yerzhan a twenty seven year old itinerant peddler and virtuoso violinist who strangely has the looks and build of a boy of twelve years After overcoming his initial diffidence Yerzhan starts to recount the tale of his childhood He recalls growing up in a two family settlement on a lonely remote railway outpost in the Kazakh steppes close to a top

  3. says:

    Hamid Ismailov’s The Dead Lake is the first in Peirene's Coming of Age Towards Identity series It was first published in Russia in 2011 and as with all of the Peirene titles this is its first translation into English Andrew Bromfi

  4. says:

    Ominous and timely when you think about our own man who never grew up's plans to destroy our water

  5. says:

    This was an impressive tale of a young boy and his family living next to the railway station and a nuclear bomb testing areaI was drawn in by the narration trying to solve the mystery of the young man's history and the style of the narration

  6. says:

    Dec 2014 The joy of the steppe the joy of music and the joy of childhood always coexisted in Yerzhan with the anticipation of that inescapable terrible abominable thing that came as a rumbling and a trembling and then a swirling sweeping tornado from the ZoneTwo families still living the ways of ancient Kazakh culture coexist alongside Soviet nuclear testing one son a musical prodigy; I found the themes and th

  7. says:

    An astonishing tale tinged with sadnessrecounted by Yerzhan to a stranger on a train journey that is in part imagined by th

  8. says:

    This is an astonishing novella which at 122 pages is full of lyricism and poetry traditional tales music and the modern day horror of nuclear testing An intro tells the reader that from 1949 to 1989 468 nuclear explosions were tested in a test site in the Kazakh steppes This story tells of Yerzhan a 27 year ol

  9. says:

    Hauntingly beautiful writing even when reporting the horrific

  10. says:

    In a Zweig like framing device the story is told in the course of a train journey through Kazakhstan The story involves a boy growing up in an isolated location close to a Soviet nuclear testing site and the effect this has on him and his family as they nevertheless continue with their lives schooling friendship musical talent farm