Bruges la Morte { epub } author Georges Rodenbach

Georges Rodenbach ´ 1 FREE READ

Hugues Viane is a widower who has turned to the melancholy decaying city of Bruges as the ideal location in which to mourn his wife and as a backdrop for the narcissistic wanderings of his disturbed spirit He becomes obsessed with a young dancer. My real trip to Bruges took place when I got home after visiting the actual city when I gathered enough momentum to submit to Rodenbach s pulsating testimony of the kind of beauty that can only be found in death like one can sense in certain places such as the somber cathedrals the towering belfries the pebbled alleys and greyish uays that compose the skeleton of Bruges once a decadent city brought back to life by the refined pen of a Symbolist s contemplationHugues Viane is a disconsolate widower who has found a matchless companion in the lonely melancholy of Bruges a city whose glorious days of trade have waned into a suffocating atmosphere of religious conservatism Haunted by memories of his deceased wife Viane roams the streets of Bruges in silent conversation with its canals chiming bells and austere convents absorbed by his inexhaustible despair until he crosses paths with Jane a young actress who bears a strong resemblance with his beloved Spurred by his mysterious connection with the dormant city Viane indulges in a deranged fantasy that takes him into a downward spiral towards a climatic ending that explores the link between death conscience and grief Rodenbach s evocation of Bruges is than an attempt to paint an accurate landscape for Hugues mourning but a deliberate effort to thread a perturbing analogy between the city and the states of mind of a man lost in the morbid eroticism of venerating a dead woman in a living corpse Bruges becomes the mute narrator and the ultimate protagonist of the story Hugues the mirror that refracts it to the reader and Jane a grotesue object disguised as femme fatale that gives a Gothic touch to the outcome of the novel Tragedy can already be anticipated in the opening paragraph but plotline is totally superfluous in this case It s the stylistic delivery of foretold events merging with the internalized perceptions of its main character that makes this book a chilling but strangely delicate experience that creates the impression of a pagan ritual branded in darkly sensuous poetry that tempts and hypnotizes the reader leaving him helpless and levitating in suspended tension in the ache of pleasure momentarily achieved but never truly possessedI recently took a stroll around the medieval alleys of Bruges crossed its bridges and admired the uays over brimming with waves of tourists and pearly white swans but it was through Rodenbach s aesthetic vision that I finally met the true soul of this town in all its withered splendor and somber beauty of past blending with present of introspective art fused with metaphorical precision PHP Pocket Reference disturbed spirit He becomes obsessed with a young The Face on the Milk Carton death like one can sense in certain places such as the somber cathedrals the towering belfries the pebbled alleys and greyish uays that compose the skeleton of Bruges once a Winds of Enchantment decadent city brought back to life by the refined pen of a Symbolist s contemplationHugues Viane is a The Odds Against disconsolate widower who has found a matchless companion in the lonely melancholy of Bruges a city whose glorious Tokyo Kill days of trade have waned into a suffocating atmosphere of religious conservatism Haunted by memories of his Unbroken The Reaper Diaries deceased wife Viane roams the streets of Bruges in silent conversation with its canals chiming bells and austere convents absorbed by his inexhaustible Bhishma an Enigma despair until he crosses paths with Jane a young actress who bears a strong resemblance with his beloved Spurred by his mysterious connection with the The Art of Loving dormant city Viane indulges in a Jack Kerouac deranged fantasy that takes him into a Reputation death conscience and grief Rodenbach s evocation of Bruges is than an attempt to paint an accurate landscape for Hugues mourning but a Alfablot deliberate effort to thread a perturbing analogy between the city and the states of mind of a man lost in the morbid eroticism of venerating a Wild Gypsy Rose (Royals of Cardenas Book 4) dead woman in a living corpse Bruges becomes the mute narrator and the ultimate protagonist of the story Hugues the mirror that refracts it to the reader and Jane a grotesue object Heads of the Colored People disguised as femme fatale that gives a Gothic touch to the outcome of the novel Tragedy can already be anticipated in the opening paragraph but plotline is totally superfluous in this case It s the stylistic The Syrian Rebellion delicate experience that creates the impression of a pagan ritual branded in

SUMMARY · EXCEEDBDF.CO.UK ´ Georges Rodenbach

Bruges la Morte

Whom he believes is the double of his beloved wife leading him to psychological torment and humiliation culminating in a deranged murder This 1892 work is a poet's novel dense visionary and haunting Bruges the 'dead city' becomes a metaphor for. A time of melancholic desperation Everything appears reminiscent of the loss of our loved one It is not a projection of our loss but that we chose to live here a place which occupies our feelings moods The inner and outer has become dissoluble Each is the other and enables us now to dedicate ourselves not to the stopping of life but to the dedication of our life to the devoted mourning of our dead love This is a religion which is supported by the mementos of the beloved dead wife including a tress of her golden hair where homage is paid daily A solitary life in a large house each day repetitively scheduled including walks through the brooding empty streets of Bruges where the only occasional passers by are elderly women bent and hooded apparitions of the march of death The town appears in its meager population to be a summonings of those waiting for time to pass without disruption to end in a good death Poetic and ethereal we march on to the peal of church bells the towers and belfry the grayness of the town s substance Only forty already we are stooped over in our shuffled downtrodden walk The woman we see impossibly resembles our loved one in appearance gait gesture We followRodenbach has created a land where inner and outer is emphasized through the distance of the third person narrator yet inclusive is the inner workings of the characters All this set in a world where what is left out is as important as what is mentioned in constructing the febrile tenuous atmosphere so important in the telling of this tale Little is mentioned to us of the lost beloved wife other than the mementos and his recall of their happiness for ten years The mementos are arranged in the house s sitting room All we know about the house is its largeness and its gloom housing him and his elderly female servant His ours Bruges is not a concrete world but a world of resemblances An entombment into a dust of memories Yet he we follow the woman the flesh and blood woman into a theater She is not seated in the audience As the opera begins we see her on the stage This is a world created for the stage as this book is an entire world created for us by us Unusual Recommended

FREE READ Bruges la Morte

Hugues' dead wife as he follows its mournful labyrinth of streets and canals in a cyclical promenade of reflection and allusion the ultimate evocation of Rodenbach's lifelong love affair with the enduring mystery and mortuary atmosphere of Brug. He needed a dead town to correspond to his dead wife His deep mourning demanded such a setting Life would only be bearable for him there It was instinct that had brought him here He would leave the world elsewhere to its bustle and buzz to its glittering balls its welter of voices He needed infinite silence and an existence that was so monotonous it almost failed to give him the sense of being alive p 30 He possessed what one might call a sense of resemblance an extra sense frail and sickly which linked things to each other by a thousand tenuous threads relating trees to the Virgin Mary creating a spiritual telegraphy between his soul and the grief stricken towers of Bruges p 60 In Bruges a miracle of the climate has produced some mysterious chemistry of the atmosphere an interpenetration which neutralises too bright colours reduces them to a uniform tone of reverie to an amalgam of greyish drowsiness p 61 The melancholy of the close of these all too brief winter afternoons Drift of mist gathering He felt the pervasive fog flooding his soul as well all his thoughts blurred drowned in grey lethargy p 89In retrospect winter s lingering finale was probably not the right time for me to have read this classic work of dead city prose the grey weight of which has now seeped into my own leaden consciousness And yet would it have been any better to read such an homage to melancholy amid the burgeoning life promise of spring or worse during the heated obscenity of summer Perhaps autumn s decaying splendor would instead have been the ideal setting in which to first dwell upon the lifeless calm of the canals of Bruges Alas I will never know


10 thoughts on “Bruges la Morte

  1. says:

    My real trip to Bruges took place when I got home after visiting the actual city when I gathered enough momentum

  2. says:

    I sometimes get the worrying feeling that nineteenth century men preferred their women to be dead than alive There is something archetypal about the repeated vision of the pale beautiful fragile utterly feminine corpse Bey

  3. says:

    “Upon the day following the funeral of the wife in whom was bound up all his possibilities of happiness he had retired to Bruges as a fastness of melancholy and there succumbed to its fascination”The old Gothic town and the bereft widower are in the perfect harmonyGeorges Rodenbach does everything possible to create the atmosphere of the morbid deadly melancholia and this authentic aura of hopelessness and doom turns the novel into the

  4. says:

    Hugues Viane has retired to Bruges after the death of his wife of ten years; five years later he is still unable to put her

  5. says:

    A time of melancholic desperation Everything appears reminiscent of the loss of our loved one It is not a projection of our loss but that we chose to live here a place which occupies our feelings moods The inner and outer has become dissoluble Each is the other and enables us now to dedicate ourselves not to the stopping of life but to the dedication of our life to the devoted mourning of our dead love This i

  6. says:

    The morbid obsession of an inconsolable bereavement and the dual mapping of that loss onto city streets fog bound and empty and onto a new living object innocent of the simulacrum she's been forced to become Or the book doesn't really

  7. says:

    Funny how years later I can still picture that one pose how everything else has fallen away – all the bitterness the arguments the boredom – and left only that I didn’t even see it first hand I saw only her reflection in the surface of the mirror I was sitting on her bed and she with her back to me was gr

  8. says:

    He needed a dead town to correspond to his dead wife His deep mourning demanded such a setting Life would only be bearable for him there It was instinct that had brought him here He would leave the world elsewhere to its bustle and buzz to its glittering balls its welter of voices He needed infinite silence and an existence that wa

  9. says:

    Finishing off my Rodenbach readings with this marvelous novel FIRST TIER A profoundly sad and moving narrative of how all of a man'

  10. says:

    BRUGES LA MORTE is a slim novel telling the story of a man who mourning his dead wife moves to the Belgian city of Bruges a city seemingly designed to mope in Mist and fog blanket the cobblestone causeways and chil

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